Archive for September, 2010

Uzzell on weak writing

If any draft of your story, on being read, seems to you chronically ailing, stuffed with words, urgently needing surgical attention in vital organs, take it promptly to the nearest ash can and drop it therein without a tear. Don’t clutter your desk and your room with sickly writings, but don’t hesitate to write them!–Thomas […]

Share
Full Story

Dante on the fear of beginning

It seemed to be that I had taken a theme much too lofty, so that I dared not begin; and I remained during several days in the desire of speaking and the fear of beginning.–Dante on the Divine Comedy

Share
Full Story

Broun on writing a book

It takes time to write a book, but nothing like as much as it does to keep avoiding it.–Heywood Broun

Share
Full Story

Uzzell on being seized by the vision of a story

If you are seized by the vision of a story, I would not delay long in writing it whether all the technical problems it raises are solved or not. Too much worry over such problems while writing may check your expressiveness. After a day or so of “cooling,” you may test your work as analytically […]

Share
Full Story

Uzzell on how to make a short story short

The solution of the problem of brevity in a short story is (to use sculptor’s language) not to set up a wire skeleton for a six-foot figure, slap on the clay until it is nearly “roughed out” and then begin hacking at it until it is reduced to a three-foot frame in the first place. […]

Share
Full Story

Uzzell on human nature

Nothing is truer of human beings than that they are not what they seem.–Thomas H. Uzzell, Narrative Technique: A Course in Literary Psychology.

Share
Full Story

Uzzell on learning technique

Young writers, like young painters and musicians, should be taught the value of an intensive study, at least for a time, of technique for its own sake.–Thomas H. Uzzell, Narrative Technique: A Practical Course in Literary Psychology

Share
Full Story

Uzzell on the purpose of fiction

The purpose of fiction is to affect rather than to convince the reader. Its object is to reach him through his senses rather than through his mind. The purpose of argumentation is to convince; the purpose of description is to present a picture; the purpose of exposition is to impart knowledge, ideas, facts: but the […]

Share
Full Story

Tarkington on process

Forget, when you work, about any result but the art result to you. Pick your reader; the bbest reader you have inside you; then make him a person who doesn’t know your artist-self’s intentions. Make him see them. Realize that he is in your hands and play with his imagination. Startle him, amuse him, make […]

Share
Full Story

Balzac on the writing life

You understand that in a literary campaign like mine society is impossible. Therefore I have openly renounced it. I go nowhere, I answer no letter and no invitation. I only allow myself the Italian opera once a fortnight.–Balzac

Share
Full Story

© 2006-2017 Writer's Quote Daily All Rights Reserved -- Copyright notice by Blog Copyright